Asian Diver 2010 - Issue 5 - Venomous Reef Creatures

My article and images can be seen in the new issue of Asian Diver which is currently available throughout Asia and Australia.  This 'Species Crash Course' concerns Venomous Reef Creatures and how they can harm you, how injuries can be treated and avoided.  It's important to note that very few injuries do actually occur as a result of these animals and we damage their populations much more than the other way round!  Check out the information on Blue-ringed octopus, seasnakes, stonefishes and stingrays through Asian Diver online.

Asian Diver 2010 issue 4 - Species Crash Course - Anemonefish

The brand new issue of Asian Diver has just been released in Australasia and contains my article 'Species Crash Course: Anemonefish'.  I help with ID of 5 species and explain the amazing gender bending in the group.  Enjoy!

Humpback Whales of Tonga

Having had a slow start to our humpback whale watching experiences here in Tonga, today was an absolutely mind blowing and unforgettable day! It is only the beginning of the season here in Vava’u, a northern island group in the Kingdom of Tonga, but the whales are starting to show up in increasing numbers. The season generally runs from mid-July to October, but apparently they are a little late in arriving this year.

Shark Diving at Fish Rock

Fish Rock is one of those dive sites that you can count on. I have been three times now, and each trip has been well worth the seven-hour drive from Brisbane. South West Rocks is located half-way between Brisbane and Sydney on Australia’s east coast and is also a great place to visit topside, forgetting the world-class dive site on its doorstep.

Wakatobi Week 8

After 8 weeks, 143 dives and 52 hours of behavioural observations I am leaving Wakatobi. During this time I have been lucky enough to witness pygmies conducting daily courtship rituals, mating, giving birth and even fighting. I have collected some great data and will have plenty to work on when I get home.

Wakatobi Week 7

My penultimate week here at Wakatobi Dive Resort has already passed and less than seven days remain. If you have missed my previous blogs I have spent the last seven weeks observing and documenting the social and reproductive behaviour of pygmy seahorses for my PhD studies. There have been highs and lows during this time when I have been lucky enough to witness the birth of a new generation of Denise’s pygmies (Hippocampus denise) and unfortunately the loss of some adults, which left their exceedingly melancholy mates (obviously without anthropomorphising too much!).

Wakatobi Week 6

Time has again flown, and yet another eventful week here at Wakatobi Dive Resort has passed. Unfortunately the news from the group of pygmy seahorses whose behaviour I have been observing is not good.

Wakatobi Week 5

Another busy week has passed here at Wakatobi Dive Resort and there have been some highs and lows in the pygmy group on the House Reef.

It was cigars all around early in the week when I was lucky enough to be present at the birth of a new generation of Denise’s pygmy seahorses (Hippocampus denise). I had predicted the time and date of the birth based on the expected gestation period of the species (which I figured out a couple of years ago) and the timing of social activities in seahorses.

Wakatobi Week 4

Another week has flown by here at Wakatobi Dive Resort. I have now spent 25 hours observing my little group of Denise’s pygmy seahorses (Hippocampus denise) on the resort’s House Reef. You may remember in my last blog I mentioned a female that was giving me some heart-stopping moments when she made epic journeys from one part of her gorgonian coral host to another (for a pygmy seahorse 20cm is epic!).

Wakatobi Week 3

It is great to be back diving the reefs of Wakatobi Dive Resort. I have spent a couple of months here every year for the past few years, and you really get a sense of how the reefs change when you have time away from them. This year ornate and Halimeda ghost pipefish are much more common than I have seen previously. Conversely, there seem to be fewer Pontoh’s pygmy seahorses and robust ghost pipefish. I am usually here around the same time of year, so there must be some other factors affecting their population dynamics.

NetEngine Webdesign